www.experian.com/disputes

 

www.experian.com/disputes

www.experian.com/disputes

www.experian.com/disputes

The only way to get a full disclosure of your credit information in Experian’s database is to get your report directly from Experian. Credit information is reported to us daily, so the information in your report changes frequently. Report numbers remain active for 90 days. You can order online for quick access to your personal credit report.

If you have a document that you would like to submit to substantiate a dispute regarding the information on your personal credit report, mail it to the address displayed on your credit report from Experian’s National Consumer Assistance Center. If you have additional relevant information to substantiate your claim, then you should mail it to the address displayed on your report and request a new investigation. If you do not have additional information, but you still disagree, then you should contact your creditor directly. The contact information for each of your creditors is listed on your credit report.

We store information from credit grantors, public records and other reliable sources following the guidelines in the Fair Credit Reporting Act. Your payment history is stored in the records of credit reporting agencies. If you believe the information in your personal credit report is inaccurate, then we’ll investigate and correct or remove any inaccurate information or information that cannot be verified. Accurate information cannot be deleted.

By federal law, your personal credit report must list all parties that have requested your information. According to the Fair Credit Reporting Act, businesses with a permissible purpose may review your information. Some examples of permissible purpose are, your current creditors to monitor your accounts; other creditors that want to offer you preapproved credit; an employer that wishes to extend an offer of employment; and a potential investor assessing the risk of a current credit obligation. We report these requests only to you as a record of activities, and we do not include them on credit reports to others. They remain on your personal credit report for two years.

A divorce decree may not affect your contracts with creditors. You will need to negotiate repayment with each one. Check out Life events and credit for more information on divorce and how it affects your credit.

These statuses, either open or paid, are considered potentially negative: missed payments, accounts included in bankruptcies, public record items, collection, creditor-received deed, foreclosed, foreclosure proceedings started, claim filed with government, insurance claim filed, paid by creditor, paid in settlement, creditor cannot locate individual, repossession, defaulted on contract, voluntarily surrendered, and charge-off.

Before filing a dispute, check your credit scores and reports from all 3 bureaus by clicking the button below.